With Those We Love Alive

Well. I do not know what to make of this piece. First, I must say I think it is outstanding that the author created a version for colorblind people. I have never seen that been done before and I think that was so cool of her to do. It started off with a nice sentence from the author talking to the reader. "Please remember: nothing you can do is wrong" across the screen. Soft music starts to play. Now after this slide, it asks you what month you were born in. I thought maybe I was going to take a journey as a Leo or some kind of adventure as my horoscope. I was prepared for something cool like that. But it turned out to be very different. Actually, I have no clue why I was asked when my birthday was because the rest of the piece was just a story filled with different possible outcomes but somehow... we all end up in the same place I think. I looked through the color blind piece just to see what would be different and it was all black and white. Very interesting. It made me appreciate color because the pinks and purples and blues were very nice.

With Those We Love Alive

Well. I do not know what to make of this piece. First, I must say I think it is outstanding that the author created a version for colorblind people. I have never seen that been done before and I think that was so cool of her to do. It started off with a nice sentence from the author talking to the reader. "Please remember: nothing you can do is wrong" across the screen. Soft music starts to play. Now after this slide, it asks you what month you were born in. I thought maybe I was going to take a journey as a Leo or some kind of adventure as my horoscope. I was prepared for something cool like that. But it turned out to be very different. Actually, I have no clue why I was asked when my birthday was because the rest of the piece was just a story filled with different possible outcomes but somehow... we all end up in the same place I think. I looked through the color blind piece just to see what would be different and it was all black and white. Very interesting. It made me appreciate color because the pinks and purples and blues were very nice.

"the cape" + "with those we love alive"

For this week, while both pieces are more simple than others we have seen, I think they are just as valid and prove that electronic literature does not need to be technologically "flashy" and "advanced" for it to impress its digital reader. I like that with "With Those We Love Alive," it had gamelike elements to it, such as giving the reader an experience of customization and control in their adventure with the piece. I liked the hypertextual navigation and different options, and it felt, while there were no impressive or changing graphics, that I was moving along the city and palace and exploring the world of the story. I think it really is something special if an elit piece, like literature, can make you feel like you are inside the realm of the narrative without any visuals to guide you. The story itself was very fantastical and interesting, but I think I liked the title on the bar of the website the most, and that relationship to "writing on yourself" throughout the story and eczema.

Meanwhile, in "The Cape," it was very straightforward in its navigation. I liked that the black and white images, because it was "as old as the story"; however, even though it used simpler methods, it had a few elements I was not expecting. I just thought I would click through, and it be over. However, they added that news audio excerpt about whistling, which I thought was clever and set that "old" mood to the piece. Additionally, I liked the option to click to see more details about the glacier, as if it took us behind the rock itself where the author and her uncle were trying to whistle. It was a short story, as the author points out at the end, but the topographical images and monochromatic scheme added life to this supposedly "pointless" anecdote. It gave more personality and empathy to the story, as we dipped into a brief moment in this person's life; however, we experienced more than just a story, and I love that about the multimodal elements of electronic literature.

Again, both pieces used elements of sound, which has been a significant and reoccurring theme throughout a lot of the pieces we have experienced in class. I think it's important to note the depth, again, that these different mediums can add to the story. Sound bytes, graphics, music, videos, and a spectrum of other media help flesh out the narrative we find in literature. It creates a more empathetic experience for the reader, which is something regular text can be limited to.

Additionally, my contribution for the TiL curation title is something along the lines of "Finding Our Quad (and Ourselves): An Analysis of the Netprov Experience for Thermophiles in Love"

"the cape" + "with those we love alive"

For this week, while both pieces are more simple than others we have seen, I think they are just as valid and prove that electronic literature does not need to be technologically "flashy" and "advanced" for it to impress its digital reader. I like that with "With Those We Love Alive," it had gamelike elements to it, such as giving the reader an experience of customization and control in their adventure with the piece. I liked the hypertextual navigation and different options, and it felt, while there were no impressive or changing graphics, that I was moving along the city and palace and exploring the world of the story. I think it really is something special if an elit piece, like literature, can make you feel like you are inside the realm of the narrative without any visuals to guide you. The story itself was very fantastical and interesting, but I think I liked the title on the bar of the website the most, and that relationship to "writing on yourself" throughout the story and eczema.

Meanwhile, in "The Cape," it was very straightforward in its navigation. I liked that the black and white images, because it was "as old as the story"; however, even though it used simpler methods, it had a few elements I was not expecting. I just thought I would click through, and it be over. However, they added that news audio excerpt about whistling, which I thought was clever and set that "old" mood to the piece. Additionally, I liked the option to click to see more details about the glacier, as if it took us behind the rock itself where the author and her uncle were trying to whistle. It was a short story, as the author points out at the end, but the topographical images and monochromatic scheme added life to this supposedly "pointless" anecdote. It gave more personality and empathy to the story, as we dipped into a brief moment in this person's life; however, we experienced more than just a story, and I love that about the multimodal elements of electronic literature.

Again, both pieces used elements of sound, which has been a significant and reoccurring theme throughout a lot of the pieces we have experienced in class. I think it's important to note the depth, again, that these different mediums can add to the story. Sound bytes, graphics, music, videos, and a spectrum of other media help flesh out the narrative we find in literature. It creates a more empathetic experience for the reader, which is something regular text can be limited to.

Additionally, my contribution for the TiL curation title is something along the lines of "Finding Our Quad (and Ourselves): An Analysis of the Netprov Experience for Thermophiles in Love"

THE CAPE

Well this is a different piece compared to the rest. I can't really think of any it reminds me of or any I can relate it to. This is more of a story telling elit piece from a girl's perspective about her grandmother. I like the scrollover text on each picture in the beginning. Even though I noticed the mouse turn into a little hand allowing me to click on the image, I kept scrolling over each image because the rollover text was all connected. No matter what picture you choose, you still have the option to see what the other pictures contained. At the bottom you can see the images and you're able to click on any that you want. Some parts of the story have sound, some don't. I thought it was cool how the ending allowed you to enter your email if you want any more information about Cape Cod or want to leave comments on the elit piece as a whole. Very interesting piece and also filled with information about Cape Cod that I was not aware of. I did find it a little dull due to the lack of color. That is just my opinion. I like when things are fun and entertaining but this one was very black and white with no cool sounds. That would be my only negative point. Other than that, cool piece.

THE CAPE

Well this is a different piece compared to the rest. I can't really think of any it reminds me of or any I can relate it to. This is more of a story telling elit piece from a girl's perspective about her grandmother. I like the scrollover text on each picture in the beginning. Even though I noticed the mouse turn into a little hand allowing me to click on the image, I kept scrolling over each image because the rollover text was all connected. No matter what picture you choose, you still have the option to see what the other pictures contained. At the bottom you can see the images and you're able to click on any that you want. Some parts of the story have sound, some don't. I thought it was cool how the ending allowed you to enter your email if you want any more information about Cape Cod or want to leave comments on the elit piece as a whole. Very interesting piece and also filled with information about Cape Cod that I was not aware of. I did find it a little dull due to the lack of color. That is just my opinion. I like when things are fun and entertaining but this one was very black and white with no cool sounds. That would be my only negative point. Other than that, cool piece.

With Those We Love Alive

With Those We Love Alive was unlike any of the other e-lit pieces we read in this class; it is classified by its authors and its readers as a game. Unlike the roulette piece we “read”, where the story was in foretold deaths on a roulette machine, this piece had you embody a craftsman. You make tools and weapons for the evil empress who is literally a monster. Her introduction, rising from black waters – “Her larval skin floats across the lake like the carcass of a pale leviathan” – sets the tone for a world where you are surrounded by the dead, but it’s as if you accept this mundane life for yourself. In this world, you are allowed to roam around her palace. This is how the game is played. You experience different days throughout this game and each day something different can appear within the text. When I first played this game, I did not understand how to advance in the game… The text would stay the same and I saw no ending. After watching a game Walkthrough I realized that there was much more to this game. There is also a “Notes” option you can click on when beginning. This also helps you navigate your way through the game.
You can express yourself a little with the choices you make in the beginning and through the weapons you create for the Empress, choosing the materials – angel leather, blood-watered wood and other spooky materials – then inscribing and wrapping them. You can explore and meditate and sleep. After you play for a bit and explore, things start to happen.I don't want to give any spoilers about the main gameplay and what happens in the end, but the mundanity of the life you have embodied is broken, and you find hope of being who you want to be.
This game allows you to look at a different perspective into the mundane lives we already live in society. We serve a higher power everyday. We live in a society where we are not in control of our lives the way we would hope. We live to work. It’s about the roles we have to play, and the choices other people make for us. It’s about complicity and complacency. It’s about abandoning hope and finding it. It’s about the distaste of being eternally tired. Just like the game, we are marked by the end of our lives with the decisions we've made.
I love how other people have played this game and have blogged about their experiences. I enjoyed looking at the Symbols other people drew on themselves. In a game where the world can make you feel so alone, I enjoyed knowing that I was not the only one to have felt this way. The meaning behind this purely fictional game is one that I love because it is so reflective of the life we already live…

I hope you enjoy playing this game as much as I did!!

With Those We Love Alive

With Those We Love Alive was unlike any of the other e-lit pieces we read in this class; it is classified by its authors and its readers as a game. Unlike the roulette piece we “read”, where the story was in foretold deaths on a roulette machine, this piece had you embody a craftsman. You make tools and weapons for the evil empress who is literally a monster. Her introduction, rising from black waters – “Her larval skin floats across the lake like the carcass of a pale leviathan” – sets the tone for a world where you are surrounded by the dead, but it’s as if you accept this mundane life for yourself. In this world, you are allowed to roam around her palace. This is how the game is played. You experience different days throughout this game and each day something different can appear within the text. When I first played this game, I did not understand how to advance in the game… The text would stay the same and I saw no ending. After watching a game Walkthrough I realized that there was much more to this game. There is also a “Notes” option you can click on when beginning. This also helps you navigate your way through the game.
You can express yourself a little with the choices you make in the beginning and through the weapons you create for the Empress, choosing the materials – angel leather, blood-watered wood and other spooky materials – then inscribing and wrapping them. You can explore and meditate and sleep. After you play for a bit and explore, things start to happen.I don't want to give any spoilers about the main gameplay and what happens in the end, but the mundanity of the life you have embodied is broken, and you find hope of being who you want to be.
This game allows you to look at a different perspective into the mundane lives we already live in society. We serve a higher power everyday. We live in a society where we are not in control of our lives the way we would hope. We live to work. It’s about the roles we have to play, and the choices other people make for us. It’s about complicity and complacency. It’s about abandoning hope and finding it. It’s about the distaste of being eternally tired. Just like the game, we are marked by the end of our lives with the decisions we've made.
I love how other people have played this game and have blogged about their experiences. I enjoyed looking at the Symbols other people drew on themselves. In a game where the world can make you feel so alone, I enjoyed knowing that I was not the only one to have felt this way. The meaning behind this purely fictional game is one that I love because it is so reflective of the life we already live…

I hope you enjoy playing this game as much as I did!!