All posts by renehua

Blog#4 Brainstrips by Alan Bigelow 

Brainstrips is a quite interesting E-lit piece as it combines both visual and auditory approaches. In a nutshell, it is a three-part knowledge series as it says on the first page. When I read this piece, I felt like I was thinking all the way along my walk through. It really envoked my inspiration and awareness.

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The first part of knowledge is titled “deep philosophical questions”. It presents when I click the letters “STRIP”. It is a philosophical section. There are five questions: “What is art?” , “Are men more sensitive than women?” , “Does God exist?” , “How do we know we are human?”,  “Do trees have rights?” , and “Is color real?”. Hence, this part addresses totally five philosophical questions by using comic pictures.

deep philosophical questions1. Deep Philosophical Questions”

The second part of knowledge is titled “science for idiots”. It presents when I click the letters “BRAIN”. This part is in charge of six scientific issues which are global warming, evolution, gravity and you, relativity, elementary particles, and nuclear fission. The animated images and texts inside each issues are vivid illustrations for each point. For example, in global warming, the images and texts sequencely tell the readers the origion of the phrase “global warming”. Wally, an earth science professor, once lived in Oak Park before he arrived in Columbia. Oak park is a suburb of Chicago with a large population and it suffers from global warming.

science for idiots 2. “Science for Idiots”

The third part of knowledge is “higher math”. There are six categories: the googolplex, geometry, addition, subtraction, multiplication, and irrational numbers. However, the content is not about the superficial mathematics. It applys the mathmatical formula into life. Like the addition, it tells a story of a pegnant woman and addition is indicated in the sum of her experience. The addition formula is applied into adding her experience of life. I love the way of connecting mathematics with life. They are different fields of theory and practice, but sometimes have several subtle association. The formula has no emotion and sense, but life has temperature. It has a neutral effect when these two things connect.

higher math      3. “Higher Math” QQ截图20181008204002“Addition”

Yeah, the exact prinple of life is called “higher math”.

 

Works Cited:

Alan Bigelow. “Brainstrips”. http://collection.eliterature.org/2/works/bigelow_brainstrips.html

 

Blog#3 Hobo Lobo of Hamelin

Hobo Lobo of Hamelin is an Elit that mixtures several forms. The combination of texts, images, and sounds facilitates its effect on readers. The natigation design is quite understandable for me. There are totally seven pages. Every page has several sections. When read it, you can just go over page by page. Below the texts are animations. The animations are like long stroll painting. You can look through the painting from the left side to the right side when you go over the sections inside pages. Almost all the pages have texts except for two of them. The page three has sound insteand of texts. Listening to the sound, I heard some sharp screams in the silent night. The page seven also has the sound. There was a piece of music played in the background. The tempo was lively but it seems inronic for me.

The webcomic brings me into that situation further. I felt like I fell in to a movie world. I believe that it can give the readers that illusion. The town of Hamelin was once peaceful and picturesque. However, currently it was occupied with turbulent rats, which threaten the election of Mayor of the Fascist-Calvinist coalition government. A talented vagrant – Hobo Lobo, entered the town. He was hired by the mayor to help Hamelin with its rat infestation.

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Screenshot of Hobo Lobo of Hamelin (Page1, 4)

The reading experience of Hobo Lobo of Hamelin reminds me of a childhood memory of reading cartoon books. More dynamic, Hobo Lobo of Hamelin is a webcomic Elit that includes digital sound, animation, and texts. The story itself is contexualized in a small town, which is a common background setting for most of the fairy tales and fables that I read in early years. When read it, readers will devote their sensory immersion from both auditory and visual perspectives to the story. It was definately a delightful and enjoyable reading experience.

 

Works Cited:

STEVAN ŽIVADINOVIĆ. http://hobolobo.net/

 

 

Bots/ Reconstructing Mayakovsky

I really enjoy walking through the bots collection. Glancing the Twitter accounts was so different from reading printed literature. The pattern, form, the way to display the texts, are unique. Everyword is like an E-dictionary that collects every English words. Real human Praise looks like a joke as it is ironic, but provides so much space for readers to think. I love the space created in every bot. All bots are not directly convey stories and plots. They are pieces of thoughts. These bots remind me of a similar kind of form of text in China. In the social media “Weibo” platform, there are also many accounts that were established for some particular and specific purposes and themes. Like a clock account, a forest account, or an account that only reports fake news.

Reconstructing Mayakovsky is a novel of future. The design of the visual effect gives me a sense of virtuality. Every text is gained through a innovative method. By clicking a cloud of keywords, I can enter different mechanisms. The author divides the narrative texts into several mechanisms such as “texts, audio podcasts, video and a live Google image search based on intangible keywords” (Michael Stevens, 2013). This exploration makes me feel surreal to some extent, but the postmodern attitude of this work is seen by this way.

The second experience in Elit improved my understanding of it further. There are much more innovative elements in Elit.

 

Works Cited:

Michael Stevens. http://scalar.usc.edu/maker/english-507/stevens-granulations-page1

Illya Szilak. http://www.reconstructingmayakovsky.com/

Bots. http://collection.eliterature.org/3/collection-bots.html

 

Bots

I really enjoy walking through the bots collection. Glancing the Twitter accounts was so different from reading printed literature. The pattern, form, the way to display the texts, Real human Praise looks like a joke as it is ironic, but provides so much space for readers to think. I love the space created in every bot. All bots are not directly convey stories and plots. They are pieces of thoughts. These bots remind me of a similar kind of form of text in China. In the social media “Weibo” platform, there are also many accounts that were established for some particular and specific purposes and themes. Like a clock account, a forest account, or an account that only reports fake news.

My first E-lit reading experience: Twelve Blue

It is my first time to read an E-lit text. It is brand-new for me, also confusing.  Twelve Blue is like a veiled story for me since there seems to have so many contents which need the readers to construct further by themselves. However, every time when I reentered the literature piece, I will go through a different storyline. It has eight bars. The lines in the left sometimes intersect sometimes don’t. Hence, it was also a quite interesting experience for me to explore how the story goes.

Jessica Pressman’s article, “Navigating Electronic Literature” mentions a unique element of E-lit, which is navigation.  In Twelve Blue, there are many hypertexts connected through links like “Follow me before the choice disappears” and “‘So young…’ she sighs. As if the seasons were whose fault?”. Following the hyperlinks, readers can gradually step into the plot, redirecting a new reading path. I agree with Pressman’s opinion that unlike printed literature, electronic literature owns a more lively performance of expression through navigational interaction with readers in front of the electronic devices. Every part of the E-lit reading process affects its influence on readers.

The title of this electronic literature piece is Twelve Blue, and the background color and the font color of this electronic literature is dark blue. “Blue” seems to be the theme and keynote of this story. It can stand for enormous meanings. I felt a sense of melancholy when I went through roles, life, ambiguity, misery, misfortune, and other nonsensical objects. One thing I found very strange was that some hypertext links were blended into the background color when I restart the story. Hope I can discover more with Twelve Bule and investigate the design intent of it soon.

blue

 

Jessica Pressman.

http://newhorizons.eliterature.org/essay.php@id=14.html. 

Twelve Blue: Michael Joyce.

http://collection.eliterature.org/1/works/joyce__twelve_blue/Twelve_Blue.html.