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Watch Movie Online A Family Man (2017)

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A Family Man (2017) HD

Director:Mark Williams.
Producer:Alan Siegel, Gerard Butler, Nicolas Chartier, Patrick Newall.
Release:May 18, 2017
Country:United States of America.
Production Company:Zero Gravity Management, Ascot Elite Home Entertainment.
Language:English.
Runtime:108
Genre:Drama.

Movie 'A Family Man' was released in May 18, 2017 in genre Drama. Mark Williams was directed this movie and starring by Gerard Butler. This movie tell story about Dane Jensen is a driven, Chicago-based headhunter, working at a cut-throat job placement firm. When Dane's boss announces his retirement, he pits Dane against Lynn Vogel, Dane's equally driven but polar-opposite rival at the firm, in a battle for control over the company.

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A Postmodern Fairytale: Leishman’s RedRidinghood

Out of all the works we were to look at this week, Donna Leishman's RedRidinghood grabbed my attention the most. I think what intrigued me was in the dark, distorted, and underlying sexual atmosphere within the piece, as opposed to the overall animated interactive narrative. While navigating the living digital story was an adventure in itself and added another dimension to reading and analyzing the fairytale, I think what worked for this piece was the fact it was so crudely drawn and animated, as well as the grotesque music and images we receive from RedRidinghood. Additionally, Leishman manages to achieve this effect because of the inspiration behind it; while experiencing the piece, I stuck around for the credits, and noticed that the author could not have done it without Angela Carter, because it would have been "impossible."

I was familiar with Carter's name because of having the pleasure of reading Wise Children, as well as reading some excerpts from her notable twisted take on fairytales.  When I saw her name at the end of the credits, Leishman's digital piece made a lot more sense to me. Of course, I immediately went to find the specific twist on Red Riding Hood that Leishman was inspired by, where I found the excerpt from In The Company of Wolves. In that specific narrative, Carter subverts the traditional ending of the story of inevitable death into a "happy," sexual one. Instead of either Little Red or the Wolf ending up dead, depending on what tales you read, it ends with them becoming lustful, taboo, and contented lovers.

I went back to Leishman's piece and explored it again, and definitely appreciated it more. Ultimately, her twist on Carter's own twist shows the new dimension in which literature can continue to exist and thrive in; through this element, Leishman demonstrates the thrill of tackling the computational narrative. Like Carter's story, it brings the same, if not more, perverse feelings, which we can see exemplified through the art itself. Leishman shows us the grotesque images of the child Little Red pregnant at the end of the story with the gun to her head, she shows us the lucid, weird montage that Little Red dreams in the field of cross-like flowers that make it nightmarish, and she shows us the suggestion of her impregnation with the cells splitting (which additionally insinuates The Wolf raping her while she sleeps). Additionally, the industrialized setting of her journey also adds to the feeling of postmodern unrest with the fairy tale. However, most unsettling of all, as I said before, is the background music. Again, it adds to that "lucid" and "nightmarish" vibe that the story is striving for; while Carter achieves the same thing with her words, Leishman takes it to another level through the different facets elit creates for the reader. In the end, I think that is what is most important as we start our journey in the class to understanding electronic literature; for me, this story illustrated the potential of the narrative world it can electronically create and exploit for the reader's own interdisciplinary pleasure.

A Postmodern Fairytale: Leishman’s RedRidinghood

Out of all the works we were to look at this week, Donna Leishman's RedRidinghood grabbed my attention the most. I think what intrigued me was in the dark, distorted, and underlying sexual atmosphere within the piece, as opposed to the overall animated interactive narrative. While navigating the living digital story was an adventure in itself and added another dimension to reading and analyzing the fairytale, I think what worked for this piece was the fact it was so crudely drawn and animated, as well as the grotesque music and images we receive from RedRidinghood. Additionally, Leishman manages to achieve this effect because of the inspiration behind it; while experiencing the piece, I stuck around for the credits, and noticed that the author could not have done it without Angela Carter, because it would have been "impossible."

I was familiar with Carter's name because of having the pleasure of reading Wise Children, as well as reading some excerpts from her notable twisted take on fairytales.  When I saw her name at the end of the credits, Leishman's digital piece made a lot more sense to me. Of course, I immediately went to find the specific twist on Red Riding Hood that Leishman was inspired by, where I found the excerpt from In The Company of Wolves. In that specific narrative, Carter subverts the traditional ending of the story of inevitable death into a "happy," sexual one. Instead of either Little Red or the Wolf ending up dead, depending on what tales you read, it ends with them becoming lustful, taboo, and contented lovers.

I went back to Leishman's piece and explored it again, and definitely appreciated it more. Ultimately, her twist on Carter's own twist shows the new dimension in which literature can continue to exist and thrive in; through this element, Leishman demonstrates the thrill of tackling the computational narrative. Like Carter's story, it brings the same, if not more, perverse feelings, which we can see exemplified through the art itself. Leishman shows us the grotesque images of the child Little Red pregnant at the end of the story with the gun to her head, she shows us the lucid, weird montage that Little Red dreams in the field of cross-like flowers that make it nightmarish, and she shows us the suggestion of her impregnation with the cells splitting (which additionally insinuates The Wolf raping her while she sleeps). Additionally, the industrialized setting of her journey also adds to the feeling of postmodern unrest with the fairy tale. However, most unsettling of all, as I said before, is the background music. Again, it adds to that "lucid" and "nightmarish" vibe that the story is striving for; while Carter achieves the same thing with her words, Leishman takes it to another level through the different facets elit creates for the reader. In the end, I think that is what is most important as we start our journey in the class to understanding electronic literature; for me, this story illustrated the potential of the narrative world it can electronically create and exploit for the reader's own interdisciplinary pleasure.

Watch and Download Movie Security (2017)

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Security (2017) HD

Director:Alain Desrochers.
Writer:Tony Mosher.
Producer:Jeffrey Greenstein, Gisella Marengo, Les Weldon, Jonathan Yunger.
Release:March 4, 2017
Country:United States of America.
Production Company:Nu Image / Millennium Films, Nu Boyana Film Studios.
Language:English.
Runtime:87
Genre:Action.

Movie 'Security' was released in March 4, 2017 in genre Action. Alain Desrochers was directed this movie and starring by Ben Kingsley. This movie tell story about An ex-special services veteran (Antonio Banderas), down on his luck and desperate for work, takes a job as a security guard at a run-down mall in a rough area of town. On his first night on the job, he opens the doors up to a distraught and desperate young girl who has escaped and fled from a hijacking of the Police motorcade that was transporting her to testify as a trial witness in a briefcase. Hot on her heels is psychopathic hijacker (Ben Kingsley), alongside his resourceful henchmen, who will stop at nothing to extract and eliminate their witness.

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Blog#1

After reading/exploring the three different Elit pieces, I found that Little Red Riding Hood captured my attention the most. I believe the reason for that is because it was mentioned in class to be a really good piece and also I know what the story itself is about. I think the author purposely made this piece according to a well known story because there was no speaking or words. The entire thing was told through the music and actions of the characters. The story made you believe you could click on multiple spots, but when I tried to click on them it would not allow me which frustrated me a little, but I really enjoyed the modern twist to it. I think the author was trying to use a boy as the wolf because she mixed in the story with the idea of girls not being able to trust guys in the same way that little red riding hood could not trust the wolf/grandma. There were certain parts of the story you could go at whichever pace you’d like and other parts where you must wait for the story to finish on its own time. Unlike the other stories I have read through Elit, this one did have an ending to it with no where else to go. The music was a good way of allowing the story to tell itself, but at the same time they made you feel as though you could click different options when in fact there was only one option to choose. I am talking about the part where she falls asleep and it asks you if she should dream or wake up now. The only option was clicking “wake up now” and so I did as I continued on with this journey. The clicking of certain things was not existing, but scrolling the mouse over those certain things allowed some kind of interaction with this particular story. The thing I found that made this literary besides the story itself was the flow of it. There was a girl who we all know had to bring a basket to her grandma’s house and then the boy shown in it who turned into a wolf ate the grandma and pretended to be her. In the end when you could scroll over the girl in the bed and almost every item on the picture things would change and it made it a lot more interesting. I tried to read this story without any music to see the difference and there was a huge difference. I realized how much the music was needed in order for the story to be successful. One thing I did not understand was the ending of it, why when I scrolled over her stomach she was pregnant? Was that a sign of rape? Was she already pregnant? I guess that is what the author was trying to do in order to make you question the ending of the story. The author wants you to interpret the story in your own way of thinking. Overall, I enjoyed this story. It was a lot easier to understand than most of the others I have read.


Closing the Distance

There is something about entering a story for the first time, ignorant yet to all it has to say but oh so ready, willing to listen, that is magic–or, at least, the closest thing to it we humans will come. Stories occupy spaces beyond any one understanding or purpose yet still offer a kind of universal escape whose impact is second, perhaps, only to that of music. But, really, are songs not stories put to music? Melodies and harmonies not stories of notes?

Stories are magical, the clearing of a storyteller’s throat or the cracking of a book’s spine practically a spell in action…. But, what about when the story is no longer tucked snug between pages of print? Kept warm by the constant lull of a speaker’s voice?  What about when the story’s space is now online? How does that affect the magic?

Sharif Ezzat’s Like Stars In A Clear Night Sky is a great example of how the magic of the story is not so much affected, meaning positively or negatively–one way or the other, but, more, transformed. Upon entering this story’s space (i.e not by flipping any pages or parking oneself down before a speaker but by clicking a link on a computer screen), a reader is greeted by a man’s voice, deep and soothing and decidedly not speaking in English which may be disorienting at first, especially when paired with the English words appearing across the screen in-time with the man’s voice. He is speaking in Arabic the English sentences appearing and disappearing across the otherwise black screen. This understanding (that the voice and words are communicating the same sentiment) takes less than a second or two, leaving just enough time for it to settle in before the realization that there is music playing hits.

It is a tinkling sort of lullaby, one that reminds vaguely. eerily of Twinkle, Twinkle Little StarPerhaps of wind chimes, swaying gently in the breeze. Either way, the tune seems to appear from the blackness same as the words, the voice, and, then, the stars, specks of white that flicker into being slowly, leisurely dotting the space behind the words on screen that are just beginning to taper off. It’s as though the words give way to the stars, the man’s voice their incantation. Some of the stars (9 exactly), glow blue. Once the opening narration (I guess you would call it?) ends, these stars become one’s guide, each one titled with a bit of text–from the narration–that appears when the cursor hovers over them. The stars are not in any specific order–their positions different each time one enters the story space–nor are there any guiding symbols like numerals or arrows pointing from one to the next. It is up to the reader to decide where to start.  Go in the order in which the story titles were mentioned in the opening narration? Follow the stars in a circle? Zigzag? Left to right? Up down? “Most interesting” title to “least”? Choice is yours.

Well, the choice is yours insomuch as you have 9 options and no definitive starting point so….

Anyway, hovering over one of the blue stars causes it to pulsate–blue-to-white-to-light blue-to-blue and back–as its title appears in white, script-like text beside it. Clicking on a blue star makes text appear in the center of the screen, sometimes long, sometimes short. In essence, each star is its own story, an elaboration upon the morsels mentioned in the opening narration. As their are no guides for reading, each story can be read as self-contained or as pertaining to a greater whole. I know I said earlier that reader can “start” wherever they would like but their is no “beginning” story, one that a reader could point to and say, “This is where the story begins. This event came first.” Subsequently, their is no “ending” to this story, this story space, beyond the one a reader creates when they finally exit, click that “X” in the upper right-hand corner. Their is no chronology in these stories. One speaks about the stars and their distance while another speaks about a sister and her inconvenient love. One tells of a boy and his dreams while another tells of an uncle and his indiscretions and the pain they caused. Should the one about the stars and the universe come first? The ones about the uncle and sister later? And, what of the boy? Where does he fit in?

While Like Star In a Clear Night Sky certainly differs from printed literature, it still has enough traditional elements to it–titled stories/chapters and lines of organized, stationary text–to make readers want to look at it from a familiar viewpoint. Who is the main character? Who are the other characters? What is the plot? What connects it all? The impulse to answer these questions is like a steady thrum at the back of the mind. There has to be something in the text that connects all of these stories. Perhaps they are about the narrator and he is the boy, the brother, the nephew, the cousin, the lover. That each story is represented by a blue star is not enough to connect it all, is it? That this story space “reads” like most traditional literature is perhaps what makes it more difficult to digest and navigate. You want it to be like a book with a distinct beginning, middle, and end. It looks so much like a book! Just online. Just different.

Perhaps if one distinct and actualized story won’t appear, maybe it best to read each star as a vignette? After all, each star offers a coherent stringing-together of text. Poses some questions, as well. Maybe they’re poems. Prose.

The desire to categorize this story space is almost overwhelming. Each star offers such a magical experience but, oh, wouldn’t it be perfect, transcendent, if they, altogether, constructed one giant, cohesive, magical moment?  It’s very difficult to accept that these stories may be interconnected–or not–by something not evident, behind the screen. It’s frustrating that they are only almost chapters.

And yet, I think it is this frustration, this feeling of standing on a precipice, that makes Like Stars In A Clear Night Sky as magical and as enchanting as any other story experience. Books put you on that precipice through a careful groundwork rooted in an organization meant to titillate and arouse. The navigation is clear–forward–one page to the next, chapter to chapter. Reveals are planned and placed in precise locations. The precipice is a point, identifiable in most cases. The rising action and the denouement. With storytellers, much is the same, with the addition of one’s tone, the cadence of their voice. Stories are spells. They enchant us over and over again, right?

Well, doesn’t Like Stars In A Clear Night Sky do that as well? As frustrating as it is to have so many almosts, isn’t there something enchanting about it, too? Something that invites you to come back again and again? To read over and over, to wish upon stars for answers, to stand on that precipice one, twice, thrice? It’s like a curse, no? An enchantment? A spell? Magic.

Sometimes the best stories are not always the happiest or easiest but the ones that transform.

“The finite limitation was himself!” ~ Shall I tell you about the boy who dreams the world? , Sharif Ezzat

photo credits to nasa.gov

 


Blog #1: My Response to "Like Stars in a Clear Night Sky"

My Response to "Like Stars in a Clear Night Sky"
By Andaiye Hall

Once I started reading, I immediately fell in love with this piece. Originally, I was going to write regarding Red Riding Hood by Donna Lieshman. I like the feeling I got when I started reading the story. Instead of just starting to read, I had to press Enter. I had to double check with myself to make sure that I was really ready to enter this new world/dimension. The sentences appeared on the screen and the narrator spoke in Arabic. They had a very soothing voice and seemed to say the intro in a calm melody.This added to the effectiveness of how the story's message was relayed. Since I couldn't understand, I was forced to keep watching the sentences appear. At times, I had to start over if I had missed a sentence.

The  music gave me an actual sound to visualizing the stars twinkling and feeling like I myself was in outer space. I loved the simple imagery that the designer chose for this piece at well. as the reader moves his or her mouse around it becomes prevalent that the blue stars carry messages and the white ones don't. I like how the reader can start wherever he/she wants and end wherever he/she wants. The music had a soothing effect as well. I feel like it opens the door to meditative thinking and reflection in the actual mind of the reader. Personally, I wanted to keep reading. It would have been nice if the designer had let the music slightly change as you pressed the different stars and read the respective messages.

This particular e-lit text allows the reader to have a small glance at each of the narrator's most memorable things/people from their past either experienced by them themselves or by their family members.The fact that this reading was relatable to a certain extent intrigued me. The narrator is so welcoming to a wide audience to be in his and his family's personal affairs. The traditional chapters of a book have been transformed into stars in this text and the author decides how long or short his chapters can be.
My key questions from this reading are:
Who is the narrator? Where were they born? How old are they? Why are they opening up themselves to the reading audience? What is the reader supposed to take away from this story? What is the symbolism of water supposed to mean? What does the author mean when they says "Shall I tell you of my water, which is getting thirsty"? How does water get thirsty? Is it a symbol for their soul somehow? How is the narrator so important that the whole world is destined to be their family? Is he or she now dead? Why is the uncle's palace unfinished? Is the uncle's palace a real place or symbolic of something else? Why did the author write in the manner that he did?

Blog #1: My Response to "Like Stars in a Clear Night Sky"

My Response to "Like Stars in a Clear Night Sky"
By Andaiye Hall

Once I started reading, I immediately fell in love with this piece. Originally, I was going to write regarding Red Riding Hood by Donna Lieshman. I like the feeling I got when I started reading the story. Instead of just starting to read, I had to press Enter. I had to double check with myself to make sure that I was really ready to enter this new world/dimension. The sentences appeared on the screen and the narrator spoke in Arabic. They had a very soothing voice and seemed to say the intro in a calm melody.This added to the effectiveness of how the story's message was relayed. Since I couldn't understand, I was forced to keep watching the sentences appear. At times, I had to start over if I had missed a sentence.

The  music gave me an actual sound to visualizing the stars twinkling and feeling like I myself was in outer space. I loved the simple imagery that the designer chose for this piece at well. as the reader moves his or her mouse around it becomes prevalent that the blue stars carry messages and the white ones don't. I like how the reader can start wherever he/she wants and end wherever he/she wants. The music had a soothing effect as well. I feel like it opens the door to meditative thinking and reflection in the actual mind of the reader. Personally, I wanted to keep reading. It would have been nice if the designer had let the music slightly change as you pressed the different stars and read the respective messages.

This particular e-lit text allows the reader to have a small glance at each of the narrator's most memorable things/people from their past either experienced by them themselves or by their family members.The fact that this reading was relatable to a certain extent intrigued me. The narrator is so welcoming to a wide audience to be in his and his family's personal affairs. The traditional chapters of a book have been transformed into stars in this text and the author decides how long or short his chapters can be.
My key questions from this reading are:
Who is the narrator? Where were they born? How old are they? Why are they opening up themselves to the reading audience? What is the reader supposed to take away from this story? What is the symbolism of water supposed to mean? What does the author mean when they says "Shall I tell you of my water, which is getting thirsty"? How does water get thirsty? Is it a symbol for their soul somehow? How is the narrator so important that the whole world is destined to be their family? Is he or she now dead? Why is the uncle's palace unfinished? Is the uncle's palace a real place or symbolic of something else? Why did the author write in the manner that he did?

Examining Kenneth Goldsmith’s "Soliloquy"

"Soliloquy" by Kenneth Goldsmith is apparently the result of the author recording and transcribing every word he spoke in the span of a week.  It is divided by day, and then further divided by numerical pages, which seem to correspond only to the length of the content, not to any other factors (for example, a certain number does not equal a certain hour).  Each page begins with one line visible; the other lines appear and disappear as the mouse cursor moves over them. 

In one sense, "Soliloquy" functions as a cautionary piece, prompting readers to consider the sounds that spill from their lips each day (and "Soliloquy" shows us some of them, a lot of them, are just sounds). A great majority of the text in "Soliloquy" is devoted to verbal fillers and incoherent sentences.  Even when it's clear that the topic of speech is something that required a lot of thought, it comes out stunted by parasitic ums and you knows.  At first, I found this annoying because it was hard for me to make sense out of what I was reading.  I wanted full thoughts and articulate insights; after all, this guy's a writer!  Then I realized that what I wanted was dialogue and not speech.  Even knowing that this was essentially a work of creative nonfiction, that it was a real person's real words from a real week, I wanted the clarity and significance of fictional dialogue.  In short, I was holding this man to an unreal (in every sense of the word) standard.  Real people, even brilliant ones, give birth to a lot of meaningless words each day.  In helping his readers realize this, Goldsmith urges them to make every word count.  He encourages readers to make their everyday speech as meaningful as they can, with the goal of living up to the unreachable significance of fiction.  I find this quite interesting because generally an artificial thing is deemed less meaningful than a real thing.  "Soliloquy" calls that into question.  If fictional dialogue, and the amount of meaning it conveys, is the unattainable divine in this case, then readers, and the hollow ramblings they engender each day, are the lowly sinners.  The artificial is above the real.  In the words and cadence of Jerry Seinfeld, "What's up with that?"

There is also literary significance in the way that words/phrases are found and accessed in "Soliloquy."  Readers can choose to run down a page one line at a time, trying to imagine the words or reactions of the other, invisible, speaker in the conversation, or they can randomly point their cursor and see what pops up.  Oddly enough, the phrases make just as little sense in order as they do out of order.  This calls to question the way that meaning is created.  Earlier this week, I read Kenneth Bruffee's "Collaborative Learning" for another class.  Although I was reluctant to accept it at first, Bruffee asserts that meaning and knowledge are created socially, through interactions with other people.  "Soliloquy" did more to drive Brufee's point home for me than "Collaborative Learning" itself.  Seeing how disorienting and meaningless only one side of a conversation is was genuinely eye-opening. 

When one takes the two points of "Soliloquy," the comparative absurdity of real speech to fictional dialogue and the meaninglessness of only one side of a conversation, together with the title, it makes another point: there is not, nor can there ever be, such thing as a soliloquy in real life.    


  

Examining Kenneth Goldsmith’s "Soliloquy"

"Soliloquy" by Kenneth Goldsmith is apparently the result of the author recording and transcribing every word he spoke in the span of a week.  It is divided by day, and then further divided by numerical pages, which seem to correspond only to the length of the content, not to any other factors (for example, a certain number does not equal a certain hour).  Each page begins with one line visible; the other lines appear and disappear as the mouse cursor moves over them. 

In one sense, "Soliloquy" functions as a cautionary piece, prompting readers to consider the sounds that spill from their lips each day (and "Soliloquy" shows us some of them, a lot of them, are just sounds). A great majority of the text in "Soliloquy" is devoted to verbal fillers and incoherent sentences.  Even when it's clear that the topic of speech is something that required a lot of thought, it comes out stunted by parasitic ums and you knows.  At first, I found this annoying because it was hard for me to make sense out of what I was reading.  I wanted full thoughts and articulate insights; after all, this guy's a writer!  Then I realized that what I wanted was dialogue and not speech.  Even knowing that this was essentially a work of creative nonfiction, that it was a real person's real words from a real week, I wanted the clarity and significance of fictional dialogue.  In short, I was holding this man to an unreal (in every sense of the word) standard.  Real people, even brilliant ones, give birth to a lot of meaningless words each day.  In helping his readers realize this, Goldsmith urges them to make every word count.  He encourages readers to make their everyday speech as meaningful as they can, with the goal of living up to the unreachable significance of fiction.  I find this quite interesting because generally an artificial thing is deemed less meaningful than a real thing.  "Soliloquy" calls that into question.  If fictional dialogue, and the amount of meaning it conveys, is the unattainable divine in this case, then readers, and the hollow ramblings they engender each day, are the lowly sinners.  The artificial is above the real.  In the words and cadence of Jerry Seinfeld, "What's up with that?"

There is also literary significance in the way that words/phrases are found and accessed in "Soliloquy."  Readers can choose to run down a page one line at a time, trying to imagine the words or reactions of the other, invisible, speaker in the conversation, or they can randomly point their cursor and see what pops up.  Oddly enough, the phrases make just as little sense in order as they do out of order.  This calls to question the way that meaning is created.  Earlier this week, I read Kenneth Bruffee's "Collaborative Learning" for another class.  Although I was reluctant to accept it at first, Bruffee asserts that meaning and knowledge are created socially, through interactions with other people.  "Soliloquy" did more to drive Brufee's point home for me than "Collaborative Learning" itself.  Seeing how disorienting and meaningless only one side of a conversation is was genuinely eye-opening. 

When one takes the two points of "Soliloquy," the comparative absurdity of real speech to fictional dialogue and the meaninglessness of only one side of a conversation, together with the title, it makes another point: there is not, nor can there ever be, such thing as a soliloquy in real life.