Tag Archives: icarusneeds

viii. masooch needs…

…a lot of things, like a publishing deal and constant validation, but mostly to get this blog post up.

Hey friends, long time no see.

Before I get into the e-lit piece I read/played through this week, Icarus Needs, I wanted to talk a bit about some updated plans I have for my final piece.

I know I kept talking about adding additional media like pictures and videos and whatnot as the story (or stories) progress(es), but I’m not sure if I’ll have the time. I think I want to try to pull of something like With Those We Love Alive, which I talked about in this post. I’ve been looking at Twine lately, which was used for WTWLA and I think maybe I’ll use that. I was playing around with it and there’s so much you can do with it. Also, I’m better with words than pictures, and I feel like I can put out something pretty cool with descriptions alone. Maybe a few pictures? Simple ones? I dunno. I’m afraid of it seeming childish in that way. I’m not sure how effective this whole “growth from simple to complex” idea I had will work out, especially with the time crunch. Anyway, I’ll ponder. I’ll try working out some kinda map for the branching storylines and at the very least start writing out the panels for the main plot.

IT’LL BE FINE, RIGHT?

Aiight, so Icarus Needs.

Screenshot 2018-11-13 at 09.24.24

I remember playing little games like these when I was in middle school. Miniclip.com was my site, alright? Particularly the puzzle games, most of which had stories to them. One that really sticks in my mind is Gateway (I & II). I don’t wanna say much about it, but from what I remember, the story in the second one gets really heavy, so consider that a warning. It’s an incredible game. Go play it if you love puzzle games and deep stories and eeriness.

But anyway. Back to Icarus Needs.

First of all, I love the design. The simple panels give it a fun, deceptively straightforward vibe, but you find out quick that it’s a bit more complex than you think, both story-wise and design. It maintains the simplicity, but… expands… on it…? That doesn’t make sense. Whatever. I’m a fan of games that bridge whimsy with emotional depth, even if the latter part is only hinted at. It gives you the sense of a bigger world outside of what you see in the game.

Fun fact: It makes me mad when games are written off as silly and insignificant. Like… Gateway II touches on [SPOILER] the trauma of losing a family member and the hold they could still have on you even in death. Also, how it’s not always healthy. [/SPOILER] At least, that’s what I remember. I gotta play it again. It’s just so good. But like. How dare you write off a whole story based on the medium it’s presented in? Big UGH.

In Icarus Needs, there’s kind of this narrator who speaks outside the panels in an almost innocently authoritative way, if that makes sense. Like it preaches to main character Icarus (I dig that name, by the way) these… dreamlike phrases that you think would require deep answers or something. Or like. Cliches. Like the “out on a limb” line when Icarus is in the tree.

But then, in reply, Icarus is kinda blunt, or subverts the line/question/cliche. I hope that makes sense…

Here are some of the panels that stood out to me regarding that:

Click to view slideshow.

His responses are so realistic while the narrator is more… idealistic ? Is that the word? Maybe not. Either way, Icarus’ responses are refreshing in the dreamlike setting.

And speaking of dreams. You’re told that this is a dream from the beginning, but you almost ignore it at first? At least, I did.

Screenshot 2018-11-13 at 09.24.54

Also it’s difficult to automatically trust an outside, omniscient voice just after you wake up in a strange room and have to save your girlfriend with giant phones, mud balls, nets to catch a rat, and apples (exactly 5). So yeah. I wasn’t trusting it or its cliche banter anytime soon.

Regarding the end…

Screenshot 2018-11-13 at 09.30.15

I was waiting for a different catch other than “and then he woke up.” I’m not mad about it, I mean. On the one hand, it’s expected. On the other, I wanted something more. And perhaps there is something more, what with the little squirrel king in the corner. It’d be so rad to have a sequel to this in a similar style. The puzzles were really cool and the story was just perfectly whimsical.

Looking forward to experiencing this again in class!

See y’all then.

–Masooch

#8 Eilt-Reading: Icarus Needs

Firstly, Lexia to Preplexia couldn’t be opened on my Mac because the screen doesn’t fit. But I found a video discussing the piece:

Mark Sample( the speaker in the video) said the work is a specific time of technology and technology has changed so it’s problematic to the piece. That may explain why I couldn’t open it. What I interest in Lexia to Perplexia is “Terms such as “metastrophe’ and ‘intertimacy’ work as sparks within the piece and are meant to inspire further thought and exploration.” SO I cannot wait to go through it in the class.


The piece Icarus Needs is presented as an ” a hypercomic adventure game staring everyone’s favourite mentally unhinged cartoonist, Icarus Creeps”. What needs to be discussed is ” It is literature?”. Beyond a plot in the game, I wonder it is readable or gives any literary experience to a reader. I would like to go through the piece under this question.

It is interesting to play, I have to admit. Icarus would meet different people and have different instructions to find Kit. When he finds new tools, a new trail would open to him. I passed the green, blue, yellow, and pink trials, and them eventually come to the same end.

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The protagonist and antagonists would have conversations, a player would know what going on next through conversations and they could go anywhere to get materials.

The plot is simple: “Icarus has fallen asleep playing video games and become trapped inside a surreal dream world that’s part video game and part comic strip. What’s worse, somehow his girlfriend Kit has got trapped inside the same dream. Now Icarus needs to locate Kit, escape the clutches of the King of Squirrels and find some way back to the waking world. Can you get Icarus everything he needs before it’s too late?”

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Personally, I don’t think it is presented as either literature or a reconstructing piece. Most importantly, it isn’t effective as a cyber reader and I would rather regard it as a recreation.