The hobo lobo of hamelin

this is my review of the hobo lobo of hamelin, and then some rambling about dwarf fortress:

What got my attention.

What first attracted me to the hobo lobo, was the aesthetic, the way the style blended 2D and 3D like effects without using 3D reminded me of Darkest Dungeon. (DD is a 2D game with this action shot like animation, where the animation is only a few frames, the way its drawn and animated makes it feel very alive and engaging.)

Darkest Dungeon example gif

And it almost had the look of a digital incarnation of a popup book. But as I got further into the hobo lobo I found the story engaging and the imagery very much to my liking, and the use of sound later in the pages works really well.

The hobo lobo is inspired by the story of pied piper, if you’re not familiar with the story, pied piper is a story about a rat catcher named pied piper, who was hired to remove the rats from a town called Hamelin. He was offered 1000guilders for the job, then the mayor stiffed him om the reward money, the pied piper then uses his magic pipe to lure all the children away, here some versions diverge. In some versions, the pied piper kills the children (either drowning or luring them into a cave), and in others he leads them away to a better land. This is clearly the basis of the hobo lobo. But the hobo lobo is not simply a retelling of the pied piper, even with some of the same elements, the narrative has changed.

 

What is the hobo lobo like, and what the navigation is like.

The hobo lobo is a side-scrolling visual novel. That’s not entirely descriptive enough, when you enter the hobo lobo, there is a field in the middle of the screen, about 1 third of the screen, with the visuals, the bottom half of the screen is reserved for the text, or lexias.

You can navigate on the top, by pressing the numbers, and that gives a floating navigation, that passes where you are going and then goes a bit back, a very nice effect that brings out the 2D depth of the visual aspect. If the numbers navigation not had this effect, you could have missed the very nice animation effects of the piece. The other way of navigation is simply using the arrow keys, you can go back and forwards as you wish.

Leonardo Flores noted that the use of the infinite canvas in the visual style to create the depth, and using the depth to create new things to find at every angle. And I think that’s the reason I like to use the arrow keys, to be able to look back at the scene, see what I missed.

In the comic podcast, “the comics alternative podcast”, they mention that the hobo lobo is not really accessible on other devices than desktop, I mean you can see it on mobile or a pad device, but it’s not recommended or any good. The scrolling effects and the depth of the piece is lost on a mobile device, and you have to scroll down to read all the time. This was something I had not considered, when reading it on desktop, they also point out that the hobo lobo is not something that would work printed out, the depth and the scrolling effect would be lost on paper. The consideration of where, how and what devices a piece works on is something to consider when looking deeper into a piece.

Hashtagoctothorpe is a blog on WordPress, its written by a creative writing student at the University of North Florida, and they had some sharp observations on the literary references in the hobo lobo.
The homages to different literary works was not as obvious to me, but after reading the blogpost I had (yet) another look at the  hobo lobo, and I discovered, if not new meaning, then a new angle to view the hobo lobo. I especially like the line “This was noticed” now, after Hashtagoctothorpe pointed out its pointient placement. I did pause at the image of the boy kicking a ball against a wall, but it was only after a second look at the hobo lobo, and the line “This was noticed”, did I catch the meaning.

Genre.

As far as genre is concerned, the hobo lobo can be different things, it’s kind of a interactive fiction. And there is no real choices in the piece, but you have the control of the pacing (except the last page). And you are left up to yourself to discover the secrets of the story, but as there is no choices, it’s not a full-fledged interactive fiction piece, in my opinion. It’s also much like a digitized poetry, as many of the lines are poetic, and many of them are stabs, or references to other texts and poetry. And it is more like epoetry than anything else, but I have to mention that many people talking about the hobo lobo, mentioned that it was like a digital comic, where the style and the imagery is something out of a comic, but the way it uses digital tools, i.e. the depth and the sound, is wholly digital and unlike comics. Still I think there is something to consider, would electronic comics be a good genre to include in the electronic literature world? could electronic comics be something that we see more of? Even in the mainstream pop culture world? I would read them, that I know.

Final thoughts.

Damn I like this piece, what first attracted me to the hobo lobo was the aesthetic, and after looking at the hobo lobo several times it’s still the best thing about it for me. Now the political overtones of the piece are really noticeable, and I like the way it is done, the boy not finding someone to play ball with, the streets being quiet, the mood changing. This reflects on the meaning of the original pied piper, where evil deeds are seldom rewarding, but further than that, problems in the world seldom have an easy solution.

i would wholeheartedly encourage you to check it out.

 

 

 

 

 

Dwarf fortress and games as elit.

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Now I am not going to go on and on about what should be the definition of games and electronic literature, even though it’s a good debate. There is something else I would like to bring up for discussion, if dwarf fortress is electronic literature (and I think it is) then what other games are as well, and is the player the writer of these works?

What is dwarf fortress?

Dwarf fortress is a game created by Tarn Adams and Zach Adams, the work began in 2002, and the first alfa of the game released in 2006, the game is completely free. Dwarf fortress is a simulation game, and it utilizes ascii art as the graphics, ascii code represent text in computers, but is used as the graphics for the game. Here are two pictures, the first the original, second, the game with a graphics pack (aka a mod)

orginal dfmodded df

Now it’s not 100% clear to me from reading the description in the elit collection, why dwarf fortress is in the collection. The possible reasons are not mutually exclusive.

One, when you create a world in dwarf fortress the game simulates a legend of the world, who exists, what they do, who is going to war, who won. It does this year by year, until the year you specified. Now this creates a story which is random, and reacting to other random things that happen, and you can read what happened in what is called a legends reader, or discover it by meeting races and people in game. This in itself can be electronic literature, the number of different things that can happen is huge, and you can simulate a thousand years, and then read about all the individual people that lived for those thousand years.

Two, it can be all that, and what you as a player ends up changing as you play, when you play you influence the story of the world, and you can change what could have happened.

Three, it’s the story’s that you as a player experience in this world that has been randomly generated, and the ways you deal with challenges and the random things that happen.

Speculation.

Now the interesting question here, is does the player create the story? We have discussed the part of the user in class before, when someone reads electronic literature, do you create when you interact with it or is it the work that is. Does my reading of a work that has choices change the story, or is it the work that does the work?

Does this change in a game like dwarf fortress? Does all the random generation, and player agency change that to be a player writing a story, not necessary for anyone else, but for himself.

If you would agree with me that the third option here is not that farfetched, could other simulation games, where the player changes so much that two games are never the same, and the worlds cannot be recreated, could this also be electronic literature?

I know that this is further into the realm of speculation, and I don’t want to press an argument based on too many what ifs, but I challenge you to play a game of civilization, dwarf fortress or rimworld, see what stories you can create.

Here is a link to someone reading a player story, I found it to be really interesting.

And here is a link to a video discussing the stories in dwarf fortress, and the player creating them.


Thoughts on a great week in #elitclass

We kicked off our #elit discussion earlier in the week with three very different #elit pieces from the first volume (-texts that certainly represent the vast diversity of the field).  We also “warmed up” our critical acumen for electronic literature in general by doing a few “walkthrough” discussions of these pieces.

The first up was Donna Leishman’s RedRidinghood.  This interactive narrative is a provocative re-interpretation of the well known French fairytale, and it invokes an ominous, dark, mysterious, and decidedly adult tone.  With jazzy, contemporary background music, an urban setting, the highly stylized comic imagery of this piece announces itself as a clear “re-working” of a classic.  It challenges the assumptions which stem from reading/knowing this age-old children’s tale.  This version seems to unfold in three parts, beginning with a city highrise location.  The second part of the text covers the forest/meadow interlude. Finally the third section of this narrative takes place upon arrival at “Grandma’s house”.  The text is interactive throughout, the reader is choosing outcomes through a variety of link options.  The reader is forced to seek for hard-to-come-by links which are for the most part hidden.  There are definitely elements to discover that are not easily noticed (including a revealing and dark diary which provides insight into Redridinghood’s psyche).  The necessary “active search” for links (that are veiled from reader’s immediate access) seems to suggest an emphasis on all things “hidden”.  Things are not what they seem.  There is more than meets the eye.  There are dark realities that exist beyond the surface.  This is most definitely a psychological piece, charged with frightening twists and uncanny discoveries.  Was Redridinghood violated?  Or was she a complicit agent in her own adulteration?  The text provides complicated layers which render this question difficult to answer.  This story seems to insist that there is indeed more than meets the eye at first.

I also asked all of you to read read both Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky and Soliloquy from Electronic Literature Collection Vol.  1.  I thought that by reading these e-lit texts they would further deepen our initial familiarity with the potential of Electronic Literature.  I also felt that by considering these texts together in a comparative light, we would be able to further hone our analytical skills regarding Electronic Literature.

I am including here my own brief analysis of these two texts (published in ELMCIP), in order to extend what we able to say by the close of class:

Subjectivity and Language in Sharif Ezzat’s “Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky” & Kenneth Goldsmith’s “Soliloquy”

By Mia Zamora, PhD

“Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky” is a flash-hypertext poem.  Elegant and ethereal, the screen is a dark night sky with a constellation of stars that become the access point for further poetic lexia.  Readers can explore the sky of interconnected poems at random.  There is an introductory voice-over poem in Arabic (with translation on screen in English).  The text is laced with ambient sounds of wind-chimes, offering the effect of a recollection of a distant place, a place of purity/simplicity, perhaps the “village” of one’s origin.  The tone of the text is soothing, calming, and dreamlike.  This lovely piece includes a reflective narrative voice who repeats “I am full of stories”, perhaps reminding the reader of that universal aspect of our human condition: that we are all “full of stories” – we are all a small universe within the larger universe.  In this piece, subjectivity through words is achieved in the most traditional sense.  There is a clear and stable “I” that is full of stories.  That subject is established through his many stories which manifest in centered verse in the middle of the screen when clicking on a glimmering constellation.  The reader wanders through the cosmos with the mouse, hovering on certain stars to reveal a variety of poetic verse which represent the texture of certain lives. “Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky” reminds us that our subjectivity is only apprehendable through narration, through words, through stories past on through time.  In a subtle and wistful way, this text traverses an essential tension that is a part of the human experience.  It prompts us to think about the ways in which we are inherently connected in both time and space, as well as the sting of our profound singularity.

Subjectivity is grappled with in different but equally poignant ways in the Kenneth Goldmith’s “Soliloquy”.  Goldsmith is reflective of his “bound” subjectivity through expendable words.  In exploring this idea, he documents of every word he utters during the week of April 15-21, 1996, from the moment he woke up that Monday morning to the moment he went to sleep on Sunday night.  “Soliloquy” is a clever kind of provocation, as it is a web version-of a book edition-of a gallery installation. It is a week’s worth of the artist’s spoken language captured in a veiled database.  The reader opens the text by clicking on the prologue quote from Ludwig Wittgenstein: “Don’t, for heaven’s sake be afraid of talking nonsense!  But you must pay attention to your nonsense.”  By clicking on the quote you gain access to his web catalogue of a week’s worth of spoken words, all in chronological order, but what is striking upon entering the text is the encounter of the blank screen of white.  In order to reveal his lost words, you must mouse over the screen and a sentence of the carefully transcribed lexia appears (and disappears) as soon as the mouse moves on.  The provocation is in the transient disposal of our words, as well as the utter banality of so much of what we say. Words are lost to the world as quickly as they are uttered, and what is left is like an empty canvas with a haunting afterlife.  Words are rendered in “Soliloquy” like fleeting ghosts or traces that can be glimpsed but not captured.   The title of the piece lends further comment, with it’s dramatic allusion to the inner life as a kind of performance.

Both of these significant Electronic Literature texts offer us a glimpse of the way that words shape our sense of selves and our place in the world.  The affordances of the digital medium pay particular homage to the thematic concerns and poetics of these two works of art.  While Ezzat employs traditional storytelling constructs to assert a timeless connection to narrative and memory, Goldsmith provokes us to consider the self consumed and disposal aspects of the words we use.  Although the tone of these two elit texts are very different, they each elicit a deeper reflection about the dynamic world of words that shapes our human subjectivity. ______________

Congrats Fredrik on successfully kicking off your review presentations with insight.  I think your choice of Quing’s Quest VII was a fun one,  and it was a good way to start thinking about the relationship between games, elit, and communities of practice.  This was a twine made game with a quirky nostalgic soundtrack.  A parody that playfully address the subculture(s) of gaming, Quing’s Quest VII is a reversal of power fantasy in which creative non-conformists and non-“misogynerds” thrive by escaping and relaxing a bit.  Through his walkthrough and direction of discussion, Frederik spurned and extended reflection on the identity politics found in games, and in the community of players that form around them.

What is up for next week?

Please read Hobo Lobo of Hamelin and Dwarf Fortress. Daniel Klaussen will start our week with a presentation on this/these text(s).  I really look forward to hearing what he has to say about the work.

Please blog about one of these two texts, or the two texts Fredrik claimed interest in – Quing’s Quest VII, or also The Bubble Bath.

-And remember  –  keep up with the #elitclass twitter feed and tweet with our hashtag.

God helg,

Dr. Zamora

#1 Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky

Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky makes me feel like I’m sitting in a desert and looking up at all the beautiful and clear stars, while a fellow traveller – perhaps someone I’ve only just met, is telling stories of their life, a life so different to mine, and yet quite alike.

When first entering the piece by Sharrif Ezzat you see a black screen and hear a man talk in Arabic with english “subtitles”. While the titles of the stories within the piece are said out loud, the black screen get’s filled up with stars, some brighter than others. The brightest (or bluest) are his stories.

As mentioned the piece consist of different short stories, styled almost as poems, and each of them have some sort of existential questions at the end. “Is this life a test? / Is that why we suffer? / Or is that how we endure it?” (Shall I tell you about my uncle whose life is a test?) or “What will it take to make him happy?” (Shall I tell you about my cousin, whose palace is unfinished?). The questions make the piece stick with the reader, at least it did with me, and the desert sky and arabic voice made me think of a culture so different from mine and yet close to it.

In my first notes about this piece I wrote that the stories were about people who are unhappy, and I think that is true to some extend, but as I have read them again I think the main theme of these stories are love, both the happy and less happy (not necessarily unhappy). There is the story of a man who is married to a woman who despises the place he is from, but I think he still loves her, or sees the part of her he fell in love with, even though other parts of her are now showing. In that story you could say the unhappiness lies within the couple.    

In another story (Shall I tell you about my sister? Please let me tell you about my sister …) the unhappiness is coming from outside. The storyteller’s sister falls in love with a man below her social class, which her parents disapprove, and they try to break them apart. Within this story I don’t necessarily think the couple in love are unhappy, not always anyway. Therefore I think the main theme of these stories are the struggles of love.

There is also larger narratives that goes beyond the family and friends of the storyteller.  In the story Perhaps I should tell you that the whole world is determined to become my family I get the idea that it’s about refugees; “Some are scared and seeking shelter. / Some are confused and don’t know how they / arrived. / Others are overjoyed. / And have already / Started cooking the first meal.”. I think this translates very well to what people immigrating to a new country must feel, while it also illustrates that no one has the exact same experience. I think there is an element of social criticism in this piece, even though it is more obvious in some texts than others.

Overall I really liked this piece it made me stop and think, instead of just be “something I had to read for a class”. Apart from that I really think the layout of it is beautiful and the text, audio and visuals really suit each other.  


Soliloquy

This week’s piece of electronic literature is Soliloquy, created by Kenneth Goldsmith.

I decided to go in without fully reading the description so that it would make for a bit of a surprise what would happen. When you at first open the piece you are greeted by two quotes that pertain to the work in some way, and to begin with I did not pay them that much attention, nor did I know what the title of the work actually meant, but I will be getting to that shortly. After these two screens you are given the freedom to pick a weekday, and from there an additional ten separate pages for each day to potentially explore. I randomly picked Friday, and was greeted by a single word; “Hi.”. I went on to page two, where there was an entire sentence, and so on until I tried to move the mouse around on page five. That was when it hit me that each of the pages were filled with a wall of text with seemingly little rhyme or reason. It was at this point that I took a step away from the work to read the description, as well as look up what the title meant and I reread the quotes at the beginning to help gain a better understanding of what was going on. Soliloquy is the act of talking out loud to yourself, and Kenneth had been recording himself doing just that for an entire week, before gathering it into one collective work.

Now, despite there being no sound or imagery I was still left with quite the impression when I first noticed that there was far more text on each page than I thought at first. It also meant the piece seemed a bit more overwhelming in the sense that there would simply be no way to really understand what all of the text is about, because it is in the end just a guy talking to himself. And in a similar fashion to when you think to yourself, the brain is pretty bad at sticking with one topic for too long, so Soliloquy in a way visualizes through text just how unstructured our thoughts can be even when spoken out loud in an informal setting. It also means that it doesn’t matter all that much what order you read it in as there is no greater narrative or meaning to the topics that are brought up.

Despite there being no sound or imagery I was still left with quite the impression when I first noticed that there was far more text on each page than I thought at first. It also meant the piece seemed a bit more overwhelming in the sense that there would simply be no way to really understand what all of the text is about, because it is in the end just a guy talking to himself. And in a similar fashion to when you think to yourself, the brain is pretty bad at sticking with one topic for too long, so Soliloquy in a way visualizes through text just how unstructured our thoughts can be even when spoken out loud in an informal setting. It also means that it doesn’t matter all that much what order you read it in as there is no greater narrative or meaning to the topics that are brought up.

This makes me question how it is considered a literary work. Because when it comes to literature you have a set of expectations as to how you understand them, yet so many of these are broken here.

Technically the piece is chronological, in that it overall takes place over the course of a week, but there is both the freedom to choose what day to explore, as well as a lack of other defined times that makes it difficult to discern what time of day a part of the text might take place. The same goes for place, as one can at best guess where Kenneth is for one sentence, yet the following line could be somewhere else entirely and you would never know without context. This is where I think the two quotes at the beginning of the work comes in;

“Don’t for heaven’s sake, be afraid of talking nonsense! But you must pay attention to your nonsense.” (Ludwig Wittgenstein)

Reporter: Why don’t you write the way you talk?

Gertrude Stein: Why don’t you read the way I write?

The first quote could perhaps suggest that it is okay if what is said makes no sense, as can be said for a lot of the work, yet at the same time it isn’t meaningless if you actually pay some attention to it. Even if not everything is clear to me as a reader there are still details to be found in the text that can paint a picture of a scene sometimes.

The second quote is an interesting one, as -indeed- the entire work is written the way Kenneth spoke for an entire week, and I feel this can be understood either literally or symbolically. Certainly, you can read it all in order and you will indeed read the work as it was written. Or you could read it in any order you like, and given how nonsensical the writing can appear to be then it stands to reason that so too can the order you read it in be. There doesn’t have to be some greater meaning as to why you read one part before another, just like how not everything you say during the day will be in a specific order. So how is it a literary work, exactly? Well, even if it breaks the conventional rules of literature, there is still some sense of time, place and progression going on throughout the text. It may come across as nonsensical, but it isn’t meaningless or pointless either.

In the end it makes for an interesting and thoughtful piece even in its simplicity. No pictures, no sound, only the written words that were spoken over the course of a week. And it does not have to be more than that to be intriguing.


Monday Blog / 4 September

I’m jumping into all of this a little last minute without much knowledge about how or what I should be doing, but that can be good right? I still have thoughts!

For this post, I’m choosing to respond to “like stars in a clear night sky” by Shariff Ezzat.

And what better way to start off a semester of e-lit than with a particularly striking line: “I am full of stories.”

Compared to other e-lit pieces I’ve come across, this played more ethereal. The formatting is lovely, and the sounds/voice works surprisingly well for being played out of my computer speakers. I didn’t mute it, which is important. Even the font is really sweet. “Pretty” I suppose.

In this piece, a calming male voice begins by speaking in arabic while english subtitles appear on the bottom of the screen. Everything that is said appears once again when the voice stops, little pieces of the monologue can be found when scrolling over one of the pages many stars.

The small bits of text you get when clicking on a star read like short poems. I’m sure you could spend a long time digging into them, but they read to me like a lullaby.

Not every star on the page has a story attached, and searching for them takes patience. However, the page had a sort of calming effect — I didn’t feel like running my mouse all over so I could be done quickly. When you finally land on a story it’s like finding a little gem or present.

These are mere observations, and they’re not very analytic (I’ll get better). All I know for certain is that some e-lit texts have horrible graphics, and some are lovely. I enjoy the pretty ones more, and the sound of bells and bird chirps doesn’t hurt.

Screen Shot 2017-09-04 at 1.24.48 AM
my favorite. am I “you” ?

The stars lived together. They danced and sang, ecstatic in their intimacy and novelty…

For our first blogpost in this semester’s Elit class we could choose between three different pieces:

Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky by Sharif Ezzat

Soliloquy by Kenneth Goldsmith

RedRidinghood by Donna Leishman

I chose the first piece by Sharif Ezzat because I liked the visualization of the texts.
Navigating through this piece of Elit is easy – the blue stars (which turn white – I liked that little effect!) serve as the hyperlinks to the different texts. While a few pieces are rather short, some others need some simple scrolling down. Another little effect I liked is that the hyperlink-stars change their position when you reopen Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky – so one hyperlink will never be in the same place you first saw it at.
Another point I liked about Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky is that it starts with someone reading in a foreign language and the stars appearing slowly in the background. The sounds of bells and chirping birds which the reader hears

For my reading I started with “Shall I tell you about my water, which is getting thirsty?” – one of the shorter texts in this piece of Elit. Even though I would not consider it a poem in a classical way, I think the language of this piece has something poetic and metaphors like „But now my water is thirsty.“
The next one I read was “Shall I tell you about the stars, why they respond so slowly?”, again a rather “short” piece. In my opinion, this piece has also something poetic about it.
Next up was “Shall I tell you about my love? She is near to me always.” This was the first longer text I encountered and is rather a very short short story than the first two pieces I read.
I read the remaining pieces and saved “Perhaps I should tell you that the whole world is determined to become my family” for last, because, in contrast to the other titles, it does not start with “Shall I tell you about …” and I thought it could be some sort of starting or ending point (even though to work as a starting point for my reading, I discovered it too late). It is also a very short piece but in my opinion, it can work as a starting point as well as an ending point and it is the only piece that addresses the reader directly “I asked them to keep it down; you are still sleeping in a small room upstairs.”

Even though the texts do not really seem connected at first, I think one can read them as one story, maybe some biography.

Overall I really liked Like Stars in A Clear Night Sky a lot and I think the way this piece of Elit is presented is well thought out.

 


RedRidingHood

My first blogpost is going to be a analysis on the Elit piece RedRidinghood by Donna Leishman. This is going to be exiting, but also challenging.

Before we begin to explore, RedRidinghood gets introduced as a “playful retelling of the Little Red Riding Hood fairy tale” and it even comes with an instruction: “To hear the sound, turn on the computer’s speakers or plug in headphones. Move the mouse over and click active areas to interact with the environment”. This should be fun, lets begin!

Skjermbilde 2017-09-03 kl. 21.50.26

The first thing i notice is the color scheme; red and black.. The red probably symbolize red riding hood, and the black makes the vibe kind of “scary”. I see a girls face, and she is telling me to read a book, she obviously wants me to click on it – and by doing that, the story starts.

I really like that this story is interactive, that the reader have to participate, and i also love that it is not hard to understand what to click on next… but if you get confused on where to click next, the mouse changes from a arrow to a hand icon on the spot that is a new link to the next part of the story.

Skjermbilde 2017-09-03 kl. 21.50.55 In this picture, the the arrow change when you slide the mouse over the window. Then you know thats where to click next.

The girls mom gives her a basket, and red riding hood is off to the woods to pick flowers for her grandma.. we see red riding hood walking in the woods with a wolf following her, and second later, a boy with wolf arms is next to her on a kick wheel while she is walking. The boy is liking his lips.

Skjermbilde 2017-09-03 kl. 21.51.20    Skjermbilde 2017-09-03 kl. 21.52.16

Red riding hood picks flowers and falls asleep. We get two options; “Shall red dream?” or “Wake her up!” — we have to make a decision! I am choosing to let her dream… lets see what happens next!.. oh no.. we had to wake her up. The “shall red dream” button didn’t work… I looked it up, and that button should work, but I tried it several times and it didn’t work any of the times I tried.. so I think that ruined the point of the story for me.

I clicked on the “wake her up” and then we see the wolf boy skates to the grandmas house and walks in. Red riding hood arrives with the flowers, she sees the wolf boy in bed.. but then suddenly she is the one lying on the bed… a person comes over (wolf boy??)…. touches her forehead.. and she has a baby in her stomach..??

Skjermbilde 2017-09-03 kl. 21.52.34

Did red riding hood and the wolf boy get a baby together?? When did this happen? Did they fall in love? What happened to the grandma?? OR is she dreaming??  So many questions..

The ending was so fast, so I had to watch it at least three times so that I could catch everything that was happening. It was kind of a weird ending, and i dont know what the authors meaning behind it is.. And I think I missed a lot of the point because the “dream” button didn’t work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


like stars in a clear night sky

Hello this is my firts real blog post in Dikult 203 and its about my tought and reactions about  the e-litt “like stars in a clear night sky” by Shraif Ezzat.

A little diclaimer English is not my native language and im also part dyslexic  so expect some spelling and grammar error. sorry about that.

The work start with an Arbic voice telling you about diffrent story he knows and ask if you want to hear/read them. The voic speaks in arabic but theres english text that tell you what the voice says. After a short introduction you are free to explore the stars thats tells the story. I took this stories as to the type of lore often passed from parents to children, there the parents tell their childeren about their uncel and sister and so on.

I really liked the interface in this work since its easy to understand and eye pleasing. The interface are designed as an night sky with many stars there you need to look for the stars that tells the story.  A cool thing about the stars is, that if you restart or start over with the piece the stars change place. This make every read different and unique.

I started moving the cursor around and pointing it on the differents stars, and just as I had hoped ,some of the stars started showed me text and a story . The first text was the story about his unceld thats life was an test because he wasnt happy in his marriage. Beause I looked at these stories as stories for children (parents telling their kids stories about their aunt and the water) I didnt look for a connection in the different stories.  The way I see it, the story are only connected by the voice telling his family stories to you the reader.

To sum upp my experience with this work: I liked it alot. I think it was a great move to have the night sky as an template to tell the diffrent story, because there are infinitve stars and infinitve stories in this world. Also to change to location on the story stars was great because different places means different stories and experience. The main point for me was that I was able to explore a different colture in this piece. As a guy from Norway Im happy to se storytelling in an more arbic way  and how the stars are more importen in their storytelling and culture than mine.